Tag Archives: comfort food

Go-To Restaurant: Your Local


You know, sometimes it can be hard to decide what to eat. I can totally forget about solid restaurants during those hungry moments. I end up trying some place new and usually disappointing, or I thankfully remember one of my Go-To places. Your Local truly feels set apart from most restaurants here in the Philippines. It is one of my favorite escapes due to its cool ambiance and great comfort food. The decor is not overly hipster and has a very New York feel to it. I stopped by for lunch today and they really delivered some great items to the table. Their ingredients are obviously some of the freshest in the city and are presented on a menu that is a lively mix of  dishes that have a familiar feel but unique interpretation. Their food feels like a fusion of many of my favorite cuisines like Japanese, Chinese, American and Spanish but all prepared with local ingredients and plated in a very unpretentious fashion. For lunch today, I had my favorite: the Beef Rendang Buns, as well as the locally well known Salmon Donburi. The salmon dish is served over rice and is easily big enough for two people to share. It was actually recently featured in a Bon Appetite article.  Good stuff.

I always enjoy a good sandwich, and that is exactly why the Beef Rendang Buns at Your Local is my favorite menu item. For me, it’s like an East-meets-West style mash up of a classic American barbecue sandwich with pickles and a sweet/spicy Asian sauce. It’s served on fried Mantou, which I know you have had, but perhaps not known the name. Well, Mantou, is the white fluffy bread common in Northern Chinese cuisine. It’s steamed so it is very light and delicate. It’s found all over Asia and has a multitude of names depending on the place, but possibly where you have experienced it, is as the main component of the Chinese dim-sum star, shāobāo (steamed pork bun). Well, at Your Local, they take Mantou for the rendang sandwich and fry it. That’s the bun. Yum. I really have a weakness for fried bread. The beef is super tender, juicy and flavorful with just the right amount of spiciness. The serving is two buns, perfect for sharing. If it was served as one piece only, I doubt other people at the table would get to try it. Check it out, I promise you won’t be disappointed.

-Jonathan

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Those buns though.
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The black rice under the seared rare salmon is seasoned with a nice and sweet house made ponzu.

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Your Local

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+63 2 823 6206

106 Esteban
Legazpi Village, Makati
Kalakhang Maynila
Philippines

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Leftovers Makeover: From Easter Dinner to Duck Stew


How it all started… Duck L’Orange with a colorful assortment of roasted Farmer’s Market veggies IMG_0157 IMG_0158 IMG_0161 IMG_0173One of my absolute favorite things to do is to create an entirely different meal out of the random leftovers that are in my fridge. You never know what can happen when you combine hunger and the procrastination to cook something from scratch. Leftover Korean turns into fried rice, perhaps some grilled veggies from the BBQ pit transform into curry, but for some reason the soup version of these meals always turns out the best. Last Easter, I made Duck L’orange and we also made side dishes from some really choice farmers market veggies. Lunch the following day was a different story as I was feeling pretty spent from my epic kitchen Easter marathon. Luckily, I had a ton of beautifully wrapped pre-cooked items ready for their reincarnation. I used the carcass of the duck as well as the drippings, thyme bundle, celery, and carrots as my stock base for the soup. I let this reduce into a very thick stew adding a little wine, a splash of water, and a touch of the zesty l’orange sauce for zing. All I had to do next was simply choose the roasted vegetables I wanted to add from the previous days roasting pan and side dishes. I went with several potatoes, some of the carrots and red onions, and of course garlic. Lastly, I added ground black pepper, and a large handful of picked Italian Parsley leaves and called it a meal.